Four Fruits that Have a Surprising Amount of Protein

Hard to belief but there are actually a few fruits that have a surprising amount of protein. Anyone whose seriously into working understands how difficult it can be to reach their daily protein needs. If you strength train and your goal is to build muscle mass then you need more protein than you may realize. The current RDA suggestion for protein is 0.8 grams/kilogram/body weight/day. This amount is ideal if you’re looking to maintain current levels. Everybody is unique and has different needs when it comes to protein intake.

In any case, you can only eat so much meat, eggs, and tuna fish. A great way to bolster protein levels and aid muscle protein synthesis, is to supplement meals with other types of protein, like fruit and vegetables. Today, we’ll focus on how to best do that with fruit. You’re probably thinking right about now… fruit has protein? yes, it has protein, not to mention an abundance of fiber, minerals, vitamins, and antioxidants.

Which Fruits Have the Highest Amount of Protein?

So let’s look at the question asked in the heading above and try to answer it. The first fruit that comes to mind is avocado. When I was younger I always thought it was a vegetable. In any case, they are loaded with nutrients and have protein. Another fruit that made our list is guava, which contains a good amount of protein and packed with vitamins. The typical fruit has about 1-2 grams of protein per cup. We are looking for fruits with slightly more protein. The third fruit is an apricot and rounding out our list are kiwis.

Fruits can be a pretty good source of protein, though they tend to have less protein than vegetablesbeansnuts, and other high protein foods. Again, we’re looking for ways to supplement the diet with protein for those who need more protein or want a change in what they’re currently eating. Some helpful tools to use are MyToolData and MyFitnesspal and Fooducate apps. Please note, there are other fruits that have more protein but they did not make the list because they are harder to find or are grown in only certain regions.

Fruits that Have a Surprising Amount of Protein

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CALIFORNIA AVOCADOS

  • Each cup of California avocado contains 4.5 grams of protein.
  • Choose California avocado over regular avocado (4 grams/cup).
  • One ounce has 50 calories.
  • Avocados are high in fat. But it’s monounsaturated fat, which is the “good” fat that helps lower bad cholesterol, as long as you eat them in moderation.
  • 1 cup contains 289 calories and 15.6 grams of fiber.
  • An average-sized avocado offers between 11-17 gram of fiber!
  • Packed with lots of vitamin C, phosphorus, vitamin K and potassium.
  • California avocados have 20% fewer calories and 13% less fat than Florida avocados.

GUAVAS

  • 1 cup of guava contains 4.2 grams of protein.
  • Comprised of 82% water, 15% carbohydrate, 3% protein and 1% fat.
  • This fruit contains an AMAZING AMOUNT of Vitamin C = 419% of RDA.
  • 1 cup has 15% of RDA for potassium.
  • 1 cup of guava has 17% more lycopene than tomatoes. Lycopene protect against free radicals more than any carotenoid.
  • 1 cup of guava cubes has 688 mg of potassium, 63% more than a medium banana.
  • Studies show people who eat more potassium rich food have lower risk of heart disease and stroke.

APRICOTS

  • 1 cup of apricots contain 2.2 grams of protein.
  • Loaded with vitamin C, potassium, Vitamin A and sugar (but they are natural not added sugars).
  • Two medium apricots have about 1.5 grams/fiber, 13 mg/phytosterols, a plant chemical that offers many health benefits.
  • Originally from China, where they have grown for more than 4,000 years.
  • The recommended portion is 30 grams (about 3 or 4 apricots).
  • They are rich in plant antioxidants.

KIWIS

  • 1 cup of kiwi has 2.1 grams of protein.
  • Considered a great healing food because they are rich in antioxidants and phytonutrients.
  • A study at Rutgers University looked at the nutritional value of 75 fruits and found kiwis were the most nutrient dense of all fruits.
  • They have almost twice the vitamin C of oranges.
  • Two medium kiwis have about 5 grams/fiber.

Hopefully, you’re already eating most of these fruits and if not, maybe you should think about trying to? You can definitely increase your daily protein intake by adding more fruit to your diet. In addition, you will also take in additional vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and more!

Workout with Jefit

Millions of members are having great success using the Jefit app. One such individual is Don who, pound for pound, is one of the strongest individuals we’ve come across in our Jefit community. Check out some of his amazing instagram posts. Jefit is a fitness app that comes equipped with a customizable workout planner, training log, the ability to track data and share workouts with friends. Take advantage of Jefit’s 1400 exercise database for your strength workouts. Visit our members-only Facebook group. Connect with like-minded people, share tips, and advice to help get closer to reaching your fitness goals. Stay strong with Jefit.

Taking Care Of Your Body Greatly Affects Your Mind

What part of your body weighing about 3-pounds has more than 86 billion nerve cells? That’s right, the brain! One part of your brain, the cerebrum, makes up about 85 percent of those 3-pounds. We have a good idea why it’s so important to take care of the one body and mind that we are given. In respect to our mind, what are we doing to take care of that?

Let’s take a look at why taking care of your body and mind are so important especially in respect to the mind-body connection.

While there are so many amazing reasons to look after your body, the most prominent one is due to the effect it has on the mind. The human brain is an incredibly complicated tool, and looking after it is no easy task. Let’s look at a few fun, interesting facts about what we have upstairs.

Incredible Facts About the Body and Mind

The most advanced computer on earth is still nowhere near as remarkable as the human brain, here are a few fun facts that will help you see just how incredible it really is:

  • The human brain will triple its size in the first year of life.
  • Hard to believe but information in the brain travels at a speed of 268 mph (between neurons).
  • Your brain’s storage capacity is considered virtually unlimited
  • Research suggests the human brain consists of about 86 billion neurons. Each neuron forms connections to other neurons, which could add up to 1 quadrillion (1,000 trillion) connections. Over time, these neurons can combine, increasing storage capacity.
  • A small piece of brain tissue, the size of a grain of sand, contains 100,000 neurons and 1 billion synapses.
  • Research has shown the human brain can generate about 23 watts of power (enough to power a lightbulb).
  • Finally, it’s a myth that we only use 10 percent of our brain. You actually use all of it (source: Northwestern Medicine).

And that is only a few facts about the brain. From these seven facts, though you can probably see how important the body and mind connection really is.

How Exercise Helps the Brain

When we exercise, the benefits to the brain are incredible, and the long term effects are just as positive. The science behind your body and mind connection is quite fascinating. When we perform aerobic exercise or any exercise that has cardiovascular benefits, the brain will always benefit. Aerobic exercise increases your respiration and heart rate therefore the flow of blood to the brain increases. At the time your heart rate increases further, this is generally accompanied by heavy breathing. The increase in breathing will then lead to the pumping of more oxygen to the brain, and this will lead to something called neurogenesis. Neurogenesis is simply the production of neurons in certain cognitive regions of the brain. Neurogenesis has also been shown to increase brain volume, and it’s widely believed that this can be highly beneficial against early signs of Alzheimer’s.

What’s the Best Exercise to Improve Both Your Body and Mind?

Well, if you are trying to take care of your body and mind, you should be aiming for a well-rounded and complete exercise program. The routine should include more than just strength training; adding in aerobic exercise, mobility, flexibility and balance. Another huge factor when it comes to brain health is to be mindful of your diet. Eating processed food and junk food has been shown to have detrimental effects on both physical and mental health. By using a combination of both healthy food and a good, sustainable exercise program, you’ll be on your way to a healthier body and mind in no time at all.

Workout with Jefit

Looking to get back to the gym after taking a long break? Want to connect with like-minded people to keep you motivated? Download the Jefit app to track your workouts and join our members-only Facebook group. You can record your training, set a schedule, and talk to fellow Jefit members. Stay strong for a health body and mind.

Want a Powerful Bench Press? Try Adding Tricep Extension

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Who isn’t interested in improving their PR for bench press? I know we all are; a new 1-RM can make a day. But on that same note, we also hit plateaus with our beloved bench press. There are, however, certain exercise like dumbbell tricep extension and dips, for example, that have been proven to be beneficial. When you watch someone perform a bench press exercise they usually have no problem pushing the weight off the chest. Where they have more of an issue is performing “complete” arm extension required at the end of each repetition. This is a reminder that the chest may in fact have the necessary strength but the triceps need to be stronger. Enter dumbbell tricep extension.

Muscles Making Up the Tricep(s)

The tricep muscle is comprised of three unique heads that make up the tricep brachii muscle. Individually, we know that the medial head, which sits beneath both lateral and long heads, is made up of slow twitch muscle fibers. This is important because slow twitch fibers respond well to endurance training or a higher number of repetitions. The lateral head, though, is made up of fast twitch fibers and finally, the long head of the triceps is, you guessed it, comprised of both fast and slow twitch muscle fibers.

What EMG Research Can Tell Us

When in doubt about how well an exercise targets a muscle group, look at the research. In this case the research is based off electromyography (EMG) results. We can see what overall percentage of a muscle is activated for specific movement patterns or an exercise such as the dumbbell tricep extension. In the case of dumbbell tricep extension, one research study showed 76 percent peak muscle activation during the exercise. The long head showed more of an increase, 81 percent, while the lateral head decreased to 72 percent. Remember that the EMG device records the electrical activity of the muscle. Basically, the stronger the muscle activity, the higher the action potential, resulting in a stronger EMG signal.

Are There Better Exercises for Tricep Development?

Yes, of course. We are highlighting in this article just one of let’s say the top five exercise. Some of the other great exercises that build tricep strength are: diamond push-ups, kickback exercises and dips (bodyweight and weighted). The dumbbell tricep extension is just another good tool that should be in your tool box.

Tricep Extension Training Options

  • Dumbbell Overhead Tricep Extension
  • Dumbbell Standing One-Arm Extension
  • Pulley Extension
  • Standing Rope Extension
  • Supine Rope or Dumbbell Extension
  • Tricep Kickback
  • Barbell Skull Crusher
  • One Arm Tricep Kickback (one knee on bench)

Jefit Member Performing Classic DB Tricep Extension

Long-time Jefit Elite member Don Goldstein demonstrates how he performs his DB extension exercise – see here. Don actually goes on to say that, “by doing triceps overhead extensions and weighted bench dips it helps develop the tricep heads from different angles; in addition it helps prepare the triceps for increases in load when going heavy on bench. Basically if you don’t train your triceps, your bench won’t increase as they go hand in hand.”

Get Strong With Jefit

Looking to get back to the gym after taking a long break? Want to connect with like-minded people to keep you motivated? Download Jefit to track your workouts and join our members-only Facebook group. You can record your training, set a schedule, and talk to fellow Jefit members. Basically, everything you need to get back into the swing of things!

What do you do to get back to the gym after taking a long break? What tips work best for you? Let us know in the comments, we would love to know and hear from you too!

Five Components for a Lifetime of Healthy Eating Patterns

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The USDA releases an updated nutrition and healthy eating guide every five years. At the core of the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans is eating patterns and the relationship with food and nutrients. The individual goal for this work is to adhere to eating patterns that promote health and prevent chronic disease across a lifespan.

The healthy eating patterns recommended in this 8th edition were developed by integrating findings from systematic reviews of scientific research. In addition, food pattern modeling, and analyses of current intake of the U.S. population were also looked at. The evidence shows that “healthy eating
patterns are associated with positive health outcomes.”

Healthy Eating Pattern Defined

According to the authors of this DGA report, “healthy eating patterns support a healthy body weight. It can also help prevent and reduce the risk of chronic disease throughout periods of growth and development.” An eating pattern represents all the foods and beverages you consume. All foods consumed as part of a healthy eating pattern fit together like a puzzle to meet nutritional needs without exceeding limits. This is especially true in regard to saturated fats, added sugars, sodium, and total calories.

The Five Components Needed

  • Follow a Healthy Eating Pattern Across the Lifespan. A healthy eating pattern includes plenty of protein, grains, fruits, vegetables, dairy and oils. It limits saturated and trans fats, added sugars, and sodium.
  • Focus on Variety, Nutrient Density, and Amount. Meet nutrient needs within calorie limits, choose a variety of nutrient dense foods across and within all food groups in recommended amounts.
  • Limit Calories from Added Sugars and Saturated Fats and Reduce Sodium Intake. Consume an eating pattern low in added sugars, saturated fats, and sodium.
  • Shift to Healthier Food and Beverage Choices. Replace typical food and beverage choices with more nutrient-dense options. Be sure to consider personal preferences to maintain shifts over time.
  • Support Healthy Eating Patterns for All. Each one of us can play a major role in helping to create and support healthy eating patterns in multiple settings around us. This includes from home to school to work to our communities.

Final Notes on Eating Healthy

A healthy eating pattern, or style, includes the following:

  • A variety of vegetables from all of the subgroups (dark green, red and orange, legumes, and starches).
  • Fruits, especially whole fruit.
  • Grains, half of which are whole grains.
  • Fat-free or low-fat dairy, including milk, yogurt, cheese, and/or fortified soy beverages.
  • A variety of protein foods, including seafood, lean meats, poultry, eggs, legumes (beans and peas), nuts, seeds, and soy products.
  • Oils

A healthy eating pattern limits the following:

  • Limit saturated fats and trans fats, added sugars, and sodium. A number of studies have shown an association between increased intake of trans fats and an increase risk of CVD.
  • Consume less than 10 percent of calories per day from added sugars.
  • Eat less than 10 percent of calories per day from saturated fats.
  • Consume less than 2,300 milligrams (mg) per day of sodium.
  • Limit consumption of dietary cholesterol to 300 mg per day.
  • If alcohol is consumed, it should be consumed in moderation (up to one drink per day for women and up to two drinks per day for men).
  • Moderate coffee consumption (three to five 8-oz cups/day or providing up to 400 mg/day of caffeine) can be part of healthy eating patterns.

Avoid the Halo Effect

This refers to someone who eats healthy foods but goes overboard on portion sizes. As a result, they end up consuming too many calories for the day. Try the following: protein should be the size of your smartphone, all carbs should be the size of your fist, and fruits and veggies should cover the rest of your plate. This is an easy way to visualize what a healthy meal looks like. Also, you’ve heard, the the more colorful your plate, the more nutrients you’ll be eating.

Healthy Eating and Physical Activity Go Hand-in-Hand.

In addition to having a healthy eating style or pattern, we all need to also meet the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans. Regular physical activity is one of the most important things we can do to improve our overall health. Adults need at least 150 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity (or 75 minutes of vigorous activity) and should perform strength training on 2 or more days each week, using the Jefit app to plan, log, track and share your workouts. Stay strong!

Reference

Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2015-2020, 8th Edition. USDA: DietaryGuidelines.gov

See How to Get More Protein on Plant-based Diet, Watch The Game Changers

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Sometimes you read or watch something that changes how you think about a topic. The topic is this case is nutrition and more specifically, a plant-based diet. It’s always important to understand both sides of a story though. Many bodybuilders and recreational lifters alike think they can’t get enough protein from a plant-based diet. So, they tend to avoid it, even if they intuitively know it’s a healthy option. Most stay away because they can’t grasp how eating a plant-based diet would allow enough daily protein to build lean muscle.

Your mind could change a bit after watching an interesting documentary on Neflix called The Game Changers, produced by James Cameron. The show first dropped back in 2018 and is currently trending once again. I would highly recommend that you at least watch it. The show is 85-minutes long and interviews many great athletes who talk about how and why they transitioned to a plant-based diet.

Definition of a Plant-based Diet

One of the better definitions of a plant-based diet was found in this article published by Harvard Medical School and author Katherine McManus, MS, RD. She goes on to say that “plant-based or plant-forward eating patterns focus on foods primarily from plants. This includes not only fruits and vegetables, but also nuts, seeds, oils, whole grains, legumes, and beans. It doesn’t mean that you are vegetarian or vegan and never eat meat or dairy. Rather, you are proportionately choosing more of your foods from plant sources.”

There are several pro/con reviews of the documentary, however, saying they get a lot right but also some things wrong. One review mentioned the show vilified red and processed meats while claiming animal proteins like chicken, fish, and eggs were as equally bad for your health. We know that certain ways of eating like a vegetarian or Mediterranean diet, have been shown to be healthy, and they includes such foods.

There may be an argument that healthy eating is not an “all or nothing” diet or philosophy and more about finding the best option to eat healthy. To be able to eat healthy the majority of time would be a good thing; incorporating a manageable diet that enhances a healthy, sustainable lifestyle.

Check out the show and see what you think for yourself, who knows, maybe it’s something you’ve thought about trying in the past. In any event, this or something similar could be a reset for eating better during (1) this stressful, pandemic time and (2) for a fast approaching Holiday season.

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Stay Strong with a Plant-based Diet and Jefit

Take advantage of Jefit’s 1400 exercise database in your workouts. Jefit is a fitness app that comes equipped with a customizable workout planner, training log, and ability to track data. There is also a members-only Facebook group. Connect with like-minded people, share tips, and advice in order to get closer to reaching your fitness goals. Stay strong!

Want Strong, Shapely Glutes? Try Doing Barbell Hip Thrust

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The barbell hip thrust exercise is a great option for increasing size and strength in the hip musculature, specifically the glutes. Like a squat or a deadlift, the hip thrust is a compound movement that targets a large number of muscles in the lower body. This particular exercise is ideal for building both strength and size due to the heavy loads typically used. As an example, see the video below.

Take a break from those other more popular leg exercises for a while. Add barbell hip thrust to change things up a bit. This exercise is great for breaking through plateaus for other leg exercises like a squat. Give those other compound leg exercises a break for a few weeks. Transition to a barbell hip thrust along with single-leg exercises for a period before coming back to the squat and deadlift.

Major Muscle Groups Targeted

Exercise Execution

Position the body on the bench so the back touches the bench just below the shoulder blades. Keep the feet flat on the floor with knees bent.

Olympic bar rests across the hip crease with both hands holding onto the bar.

Keep chin tucked and the ribs down.

Lift the hips off the ground performing hip extension. The key is to raise the hips high enough to get maximal hip extension.

The knees are at 90-degree angles and both body and thighs are parallel with the floor at the end (top) of the movement. Keep chin tucked.

Do not over-arch the back during the movement.

The Barbell Hip Thrust Exercise Performed by Jefit Elite Member

Image Credit: @don_fit on Instagram

Does Barbell Hip Thrust Offer More Muscle Activation than a Squat?

Some would say the barbell hip thrust offers a higher glute activation than a squat when looking solely at the involvement of the gluteus maximus. The best way to get more of an understanding is through EMG analysis. Let’s compare the two exercises through research. A 2019 study published in the Journal of Sports Medicine concluded “the mechanics of the BHT favors the greater activation of the extensor muscles of the hip compared to more conventional exercises.” A second study published in the Journal of Strength & Conditioning, in 2018, also suggested that the hip thrust movement may be optimal for training the gluteus maximus muscle group in comparison to the back squat and split squat. Finally, some additional information from Bret Contreras, PhD, a leading expert on the hip thrust movement, presented here.

Workout with Jefit

Millions of members are having great success using the Jefit app. One such individual is Don who, pound for pound, is one of the strongest individuals we’ve come across in our Jefit community. Check out some of his amazing instagram posts. Jefit is a fitness app that comes equipped with a customizable workout planner, training log, the ability to track data and share workouts with friends. Take advantage of Jefit’s 1400 exercise database for your strength workouts. Visit our members-only Facebook group. Connect with like-minded people, share tips, and advice to help get closer to reaching your fitness goals. Stay strong with Jefit.

References

Neto, W.K., et al., Barbell Hip Thrust, Muscular Activation and Performance: A Systematic Review. J Sports Sci Med. 2019 Jun; 18(2): 198–206.
Published online 2019 Jun 1.

Williams, M., et al., Activation of the Gluteus Maximus During Performance of the Back Squat, Split Squat, and Barbell Hip Thrust and the Relationship With Maximal Sprinting. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research. 2018. doi: 10.1519/JSC.0000000000002651

Top photo – Image credit: Photo by Victor Freitas on Unsplash

What’s More Important for Weight Loss: Exercise or Diet?

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Have you ever wondered about the value of exercise and diet as it relates to weight loss? Which do you think is more important, exercise or diet? If you’re looking to losing weight, both diet and exercise are critical pieces of the puzzle. Many people, though, place more focus on the diet aspect. If you’re looking to maintain a healthy, sustainable lifestyle then you need to consistently monitor both. Remember, you can’t manage something if you don’t measure it. Finally, if the goal is simply to build lean muscle mass, then strength training and diet are paramount. The goal in this scenario is to create a surplus of calories each day. Weight gain and ultimately adding more muscle mass can not occur if this does not happen.

National Weight Control Registry (NWCR)

One of the best research-based organizations that looks at the weight loss question is the National Weight Control Registry (NWCR). The NWCR is the brain-child of Rena Wing, PhD, from Brown University Medical School. The NWCR “provides information about the strategies used by successful weight loss maintainers to achieve and maintain long-term weight loss.” The NWCR is currently tracking over 10,000 individuals who have lost significant amounts of weight and, more importantly, have kept it off for long periods of time.

Main Outcome from NWCR

NWCR members have lost an average of 73 pounds and maintained the loss for more than 5 years. “To maintain their weight loss, members report high levels of physical activity (≈1 h/day/walking), eating a low-calorie, low-fat diet, eating breakfast regularly, self-monitoring weight, and maintaining a consistent eating pattern across weekdays and weekends.”

What should help clear up this debate is the fact that only 1 percent of the NWCR database (>10,000 subjects) have been successful at keeping their weight off with exercise alone. About 10 percent of the subjects have been successful with weight loss maintenance by focusing on diet alone. More than 89 percent of the subjects have been successful because of BOTH diet and exercise modifications.

NWCR

Finally, maintaining an active lifestyle throughout the week and especially on the weekend is important no matter what the goal. Focus on eating clean, healthy foods, avoid highly processed foods and finally, watch the added sugar in everything you eat. Lastly, sticking to a healthy diet and getting regular exercise will always be good choices when it comes to weight-loss.

Workout with Jefit

Take advantage of Jefit’s 1400 exercise database for your strength workouts. Jefit is a fitness app that comes equipped with a customizable workout planner, training log, and ability to track data. There is also a members-only Facebook group. Connect with like-minded people, share tips, and advice to help get closer to reaching your fitness goals. Stay strong with Jefit.

Quality Sleep is Important But Never More Than Now

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“Sleep is the best meditation.” 

~ Dalai Lama

When you end up not getting quality sleep during the night, you typically feel “off” throughout the next day. Not only can your mood and energy level be low, your workout usually suffers too. This seems to happen when you’re clocking less than 6 hours of sleep a night on a consistent basis. In addition to that, you may also notice, you crave unhealthy foods following a sub-optimal amount of sleep the previous night.

Quality of Sleep

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What’s the Definition of Good, Quality Sleep

Sleep quality, as opposed to sleep quantity, refers to how well you sleep. It also includes falling asleep within 30-minutes or less, and sleeping through the night without having the need to get up. The one final piece you could add to the mix is when you’re awaken, for whatever reason, you’re able to fall back to sleep within 20-minutes.

The most valuable assets you have are your mind and body and they require a certain amount of sleep each night to function optimally. With that said, more than 60 percent of the population does not sleep well throughout the night. Research shows people getting less than six hours of sleep have higher blood levels of inflammatory proteins than those who sleep more than six hours. This is important because inflammation is linked to diabetes, stroke, heart disease, arthritis, and premature aging. This data was published in the Centers for Disease and Control and Morbidity and Mortality Report.

The Association Between Quality Sleep and Exercise

You work hard in the gym and try to eat healthy to give yourself the best chance for success. The last thing you want to do is ruin those odds by getting minimal sleep. Research from University of Chicago and University of Wisconsin show people who slept more carried less body fat. Subjects who monitored caloric intake and averaged 5.5 hours of sleep, had more body fat compared to subjects consistently getting 8.5 hours of sleep.

Finally, the Wisconsin Sleep Cohort Study looked at more than 1,000 subjects regarding their sleep patterns. They found those who slept less than 8 hours a night had an increase in BMI proportional to decreased sleep.

National Sleep Foundation’s recommends 7-9 hours of uninterrupted, quality sleep for adults (ages 18-64). For older adults (age 65+), they suggest 7-8 hours of sleep a night. These recommendations were updated in 2015 and published in Sleep Health: The Official Journal of the National Sleep Foundation.

Final Thought on Sleep

One final comment on the importance of sleep that’s explained nicely in the book, Biological Rhythms and Exercise. “Weight-training exercises may be unaffected by partial sleep loss early on in a training session, but the performance suffers due to lack of drive and concentration as the (exercise) session continues.”

We are currently living in unprecedented times during this past year, and stress has affected us in some way or another. Stress is a natural physical and mental reaction to how we’re living our life. Use both regular exercise and aim for quality sleep each night to help reduce the amount of stress in your life. Stay strong with Jefit app.

6 Helpful Tips You Need to Know About Jefit Iron Points

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The Jefit app offers members an opportunity to continually earn iron points for logging workout data, sharing items in the community and much more. Many Jefit users have said that iron points are a great motivational tool that helps them workout more consistently. One of the many great things about Jefit iron points is having the flexibility to cash them in for an upgrade to Jefit Elite.

The award-winning app has more than 9 million downloads currently on iTunes with a growing database of new users every day. Here are a few tips that spotlight the value behind Jefit iron points.

Helpful Tips About Jefit Iron Points

Jefit points are “consumable.” Did you know there are a few ways to get a free upgrade to Elite? First, each time you earn 1000 iron points, you’ll have the option to “cash in” those points for a free month of Elite. Nice! See the second way to get that upgrade to Elite further below in the article.

You have a maximum of 20 times a month where you can earn iron points for a valid workout session. The minimum length of time for a workout is currently set at 20-minutes. Note, there has been some discussion about lowering this time a bit because of shorter home workouts. We’ll keep you posted on that. Be sure to always…always…share your logs to the community. Sharing it means synchronizing the data to the web server thus earning valid points.

Here is another tip for you, the best way to maximize Jefit iron points is to consistently train and track your progress. Simple as that! Persistence definitely pays off here in the long run. Remember, train and log it. Jefit will handle the rest.

The majority of people use the Jefit app to log, plan and track strength workouts. But don’t forget about doing cardio exercise and getting iron points for your time. You can earn 20 iron points for a minimum of 20-minutes of any type of cardio. Don’t miss out!

Also, engaging in and around the Jefit community is another easy way to earn iron points. Many members like to provide tips and advice regarding their friends workouts. The good news here? You earn more iron points for doing so.

Finally, millions of members use and love the Jefit app. By simply letting your family and friends know how great the app is could lead to a savings for you. When a friend eventually becomes an active user, for two weeks or longer, you guessed it, another free month of Elite comes your way!

One Thing to Watch Out For

Avoid working out twice in a 24 hour time frame. For example, your first workout starts at 9 am and then a second at 9 pm. There’s a built-in cooling period. It also keeps someone from point “stuffing” by entering bogus workouts one after the other in order to increase iron points.

Valid Scoring For Workouts Look Like This:

Finished a valid workout session, you receive 20 points!

Complete 2 workout sessions within 4 days, 5 points.
Finished 3 workout sessions within 6 days, 5 points.
Complete 4 workout sessions within 8 days, 10 points.

Workout With Jefit

Take advantage of Jefit’s 1400 exercise database in your workouts. Jefit is a fitness app that comes equipped with a customizable workout planner, training log, and ability to track data. There is also a members-only Facebook group. Connect with like-minded people, share tips, and advice to help get closer to reaching your fitness goals. Stay strong with Jefit.

New Audio Cue Module to Be Released Soon on Jefit

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The Jefit app will soon have a new update that will improve the workout experience on their award-winning app. The new feature, called audio cue module, allows everyone to be “hands free” during a workout. The audio feature offers voice commands at the beginning, during and at the end of each set of exercises. This lets someone who uses the app to be hands free during a bodyweight interval workout, as an example. In addition, it keeps the person fully engaged in their workout. Rather than the need to continually slow things down, as would be the case, if they were always checking at their screen. In turn, creating a more challenging workout while optimizing exercise flow on the app.

The Jefit Audio Cue Module

The soon to be released Jefit audio cue module will prompt someone after they start a workout with a specific command. The experience begins with “Ready Go!” followed by “first, barbell bench press” as an example. When you’re halfway done with the set you’ll hear an audio cue letting you know just that. The same holds true for the end of each set as well. The person also has the option of turning off the audio command feature before they begin the workout. This new feature will allow a person to put the phone down while working out. Take a moment to listen to the audio cue in this Jefit Instagram post, that can be found here.

Workout with Jefit

The Jefit team looks forward to supporting members with new features like the new audio cue module. Jefit is a fitness app that comes equipped with a customizable workout planner, training log, as well as a members-only Facebook group. Connect with like-minded people, share tips, advice, and motivation, to get you closer to your fitness goals today. Stay strong with Jefit.

Four of the Best Exercise Podcasts to Motivate You Right Now!

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Could you use a little more motivational exercise knowledge right now? The following are four of the best exercise podcasts that have dropped in October. Each of these episodes are from intelligent sources who are considered experts in their particular fields. We have featured some of the best podcasts and book updates previously on our site, in case you missed them. Enjoy these latest episodes during your next workout or when you have some time to chill.

One of the Best Exercise Podcasts – Peter Attia, MD

Episode # 134: James O’Keefe is a preventative cardiologist and bestselling author of The Forever Young Diet and Lifestyle. In this episode, James discusses cardiac physiology and what makes the human heart susceptible to disease. He provides evidence for what supports his approach to exercise – elucidating both positive and negative kinds of exercise for heart health. He also discusses the role of nutrition, specific nutrients, and pharmacological interventions to support heart and brain longevity.

20-Minute Fitness – Shape

Listen to this week’s episode of 20-Minute Fitness to hear the full story about muscle recovery by the Founder of Hyperice, Anthony Katz, a recovery expert. He discusses the science behind various recovery techniques using his suite of recovery products which, full disclosure, I’ve tried and really do the trick. We have also discussed one of his products, the Hypervolt, in a previous post on Jefit that you can read here.

The Breaking Muscle Podcast

Here is the third episode that made our list of four best exercise podcasts for October 2020. This shows has Chris Barakat, MS, ATC, the founder of School of Gainz and Competitive Breed. He is also a competitive natural bodybuilder, researcher, and educator who knows his stuff. In this episode Chris and Tom talk about whether delayed onset muscle soreness is a useful indicator of effective training. Also discussed, what actually makes a good muscle building exercise, and how much variety do you need in your training. Finally, they discussed an often misunderstood topic, periodization, asking the question…is it a good muscle building tool.

Barbend Podcast

The final podcast episode is a 30-minute talk with Dr. Bo Babenko, a physical therapist and trainer. He discuss injury myths and misconceptions. Dr. Babenko has worn many hats in fitness career over the past decade: physical therapist, triathlete, CrossFit regionals competitor, and more. The conversation is geared towards what’s changed about physical therapy and recovery during Bo’s career. Also discussed, are the most common myths and misconceptions regarding injury recovery. This is one episode that can be very useful to just about anyone who strength trains.

Let us know if you “connected” with one of our best exercise podcasts for the month of October. If you know of a better podcast please let us know. Stay strong with Jefit.

Build Strong, Powerful Shoulders With a Push Press Exercise

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Are you looking for a new exercise to add strength and size to your shoulders? A great movement that can help is the push press exercise. You may have seen someone at the gym doing it using either a barbell, dumbbells, or kettlebells. We love the versatility and effectiveness of this compound movement. The exercise engages both upper and lower body muscle groups. Any time you lift and hold something overhead, you get the added bonus of activating the muscles responsible for improving core strength.

Muscle Groups Used in a Push Press Exercise

The push press exercise requires full use of the legs and hips to drive the weight overhead. The upper body relies on the shoulders, chest and tricep muscles to extend the arms overhead. The muscles that make up the core are also activated during the push press, according to research published in the International Journal of Kinesiology & Sport Science. In that paper, by the way, it’s mention that the push press exercise is superior when compared to an overhead press in terms of overall muscle activation.

Muscles Involved:

  • Hips
  • Quadriceps
  • Core
  • Upper Back
  • Chest
  • Shoulders
  • Arms

How to Execute the Push Press Exercise

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Addressing the Bar (Rack Positioning)

Take hold of an Olympic bar with an overhand grip, slightly wider than shoulder-width. Try using a width similar to bench press. You can alway spread out the hands more if and when needed. An important point is the positioning of the elbows. The elbows should be as close to the bar as your body allows. What you don’t want is the forearms positioned vertically. After grasping the bar, let the elbows flare out a bit; make sure the elbows are not facing straight down as previously mentioned. Extend the neck slightly, looking upward.

The Dip

Just as it sounds, the dip is a small movement via the hips and legs. It refers to the hips dropping straight down (not back like a squat). The knees also flex slightly at this point. The cumulative effect of this is what initiates the push press movement. It should be perform using a smooth, controlled speed. The focus is on keeping the body upright and core braced.

The Drive

Here is where the push press exercise starts to come together. This is also where all your momentum will come from. Keep the chest upright. Let your hips and legs initiate the movement NOT your arms. If you feel you are “muscling it up” then you are doing the exercise wrong.

Overhead Position

When the bar is pushed upward, it should be positioned directly over the head. The arms should be extended and slightly back behind the ears. Watch the head going too far forward as the weight is driven overhead.

Exercise Variations

The push press exercise is typically performed with a barbell. But there are other ways the exercise can be done if a barbell is not available. Try the following four options:

  • Single Arm Push Press (dumbbell, kettlebell)
  • Dumbbell Push Press
  • Kettlebell Push Press
  • Behind the Neck Push Press

Workout with Jefit

Let the Jefit app help you record and track each repetition of exercises like the push press or 1400 additional exercises if you’re not into the push press exercise. Jefit is a fitness app that comes equipped with a customizable workout planner, training log, as well as a members-only Facebook group. Connect with like-minded people, share tips, advice, and wins, to get you closer to your fitness goals today.